Thin film deposition using atmospheric plasma

Thin film deposition using atmospheric plasma

Feature Article - Thin film deposition using atmospheric plasma

Interesting research into the deposition of antibacterial thin film with embedded silver nanoparticles using atmospheric plasma.

Engineering of Composite Organosilicon Thin Films with Embedded Silver Nanoparticles via Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Process for Antibacterial Activity

Xiaolong Deng1,2,*, Christophe Leys1, Danijela Vujosevic3, Vineta Vuksanovic3,4, Uros Cvelbar5, Nathalie De Geyter1, Rino Morent1 and Anton Nikiforov1,6 Version of Record online: 3 JUL 2014 DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201400042 © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim

An innovative antibacterial thin film with embedded silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) is investigated through atmospheric pressure plasma deposition. The process is based on a single-step fabrication of nanocomposite films where AgNPs are fed directly into the discharge zone. The morphology and stoichiome try of the thin films, characterized with SEM/EDX, GD-OES, and XPS, can be tailored by the plasma parameters and the quantity of introduced AgNPs. An exceptional 32 at% of AgNPs is reached in the work. The antibacterial assays using Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus strains show effective antibacterial activity of the films and indicate that the fabrication of nanocomposite films using atmospheric pressure plasma represents a feasible way to overcome the issue of device related infection.

1. Introduction

Biomedical devices have become an essential part of the human healthcare system. Henceforth, depending on the type of operational procedure, infections associated with the medical devices, especially with medical surgical tools and supporting parts are responsible for at least 1.5–7.2 at%  post-operational complications. [1,2]

This poses significant health risk for patients and increased health costs through prolonged treatments. Moreover, due to the widespread use of biocides, prevalent antibacterial resistance has been developed, which often requires the replacement of the infected devices. [3,4]

The earliest and essential event in pathogenesis of an infection related to biomaterials is the attachments of microorganisms to the surface. This produces extracellular polysaccharides, resulting in the formation of a biofilm and eventually leading to infections. [5]

Engineering of Composite Organosilicon Thin Films with Embedded Silver Nanoparticles via Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Process for Antibacterial Activity

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